The Robinson Library
THE ROBINSON LIBRARY
The Robinson Library >> General and Old World History >> Northern Europe >> Finland >> 1523 to Present
Finland Declares Its Independence

Imperial Russia collapsed in the March Revolution of 1917, and Finland began to explore the potential for increased autonomy or even independence. The Russian provisional government then fell in its turn in the October Revolution, bringing the Bolsheviks to power, and Finnish independence seemed even more possible..

On December 4, 1917, Finland's Senate, led by P.E. Svinhufvud, issued a Declaration of Independence. It was published as a communication "To the people of Finland," and Parliament passed it on December 6.

the Senate drafting a resolution of independence
the Senate drafting a resolution of independence

The Senate immediately set about gaining international recognition for their newly independent state. The Council of People's Commissars of Soviet Russia recognized Finland's independence on December 31, 1917. Sweden and France followed suit on January 4, 1918, Germany two days later, and most other European countries soon afterwards. The United States and Great Britain did not officially recognize Finland until 18 months later.

SEE ALSO
Russia
Sweden
France
Germany
United States
Great Britain

Questions or comments about this page?

The Robinson Library >> General and Old World History >> Northern Europe >> Finland >> 1523 to Present

This page was last updated on December 05, 2017.