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The Robinson Library >> American History >> United States: General History and Description >> Early 20th Century, 1901-1961 >> Calvin Coolidge's Administration, 1923-1929
An Overview of Calvin Coolidge's Administration

The sixth Vice-President to become President upon the death of a chief executive, Calvin Coolidge was vacationing at his father's farm in Vermont when President Warren G. Harding died on August 3, 1923. The elder Coolidge, a notary public, administered the oath of office in the dining room. In 1924, Coolidge was elected to a full four-year term. He enjoyed great popularity and probably could have been re-elected to another full term, but chose to retire instead. His terse announcement became his most famous statement: "I do not choose to run for President in 1928."

White House portrait of Calvin Coolidge

Election of 1924
Candidate

Calvin Coolidge
John W. Davis

Popular Vote

15,718,211
8,385,283

Electoral Vote

382
136

His Vice-President and Cabinet
Vice-President Charles G. Dawes
Secretary of State Charles Evans Hughes
Frank B. Kellogg (1925)
Secretary of the Treasury Andrew W. Mellon
Secretary of War John W. Weeks
Dwight F. Davis (1925)
Attorney General Harry M. Daugherty
Harlan F. Stone (1924)
John G. Sargent (1925)
Postmaster General Harry S. New
Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby
Curtis D. Wilbur (1924)
Secretary of the Interior Hubert Work
Roy O. West (1928)
Secretary of Agriculture Henry C. Wallace
Howard M. Gore (1924)
William M. Jardine (1925)
Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover
William F. Whiting (1928)
Secretary of Labor James J. Davis
United States Events During His Administration
Population in 1929 122,000,000
1924 Coolidge forced the resignation of Attorney General Daugherty in the wake of the Teapot Dome Scandal.
1925 The first diesel locomotive in regular service began operating in New York City.
World Events During His Administration
1924 Civil war raged in China.
1924 The first round-the-world flight was accomplished by two U.S. Army biplanes.
1925 The Locarno Conference resulted in establishing a neutral Rhineland.
1926 U.S. Marines landed in Nicaragua to help stabilize that nation's government.
1926 The first flight over the North Pole was made by Richard E. Byrd and Floyd Bennett.
1927 Charles Lindbergh flew non-stop across the Atlantic from New York City to Paris.
1927 The Jazz Singer, the first "talking" motion picture, was produced.
1927 Radiotelephony connected New York City and London.
1928 The Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact was signed in Paris.

SEE ALSO
Charles Evans Hughes
Andrew W. Mellon
Herbert Hoover
China
Nicaragua
Richard E. Byrd
Charles Lindbergh

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The Robinson Library >> American History >> United States: General History and Description >> Early 20th Century, 1901-1961 >> Calvin Coolidge's Administration, 1923-1929

This page was last updated on October 26, 2017.